Apple Posts MobileMe Status Page With RSS Feed.

See it and subscribe here

This was a good idea, and they seem to be “coming clean” with some details of the extent of the damage caused so far. For example, in referring to the infamous 1% of users with no email access: 

As of today a team was able to restore limited web access to those accounts so the affected members can use their browsers to read mail that has arrived since last Friday (though not before) as well as send and receive new mail. The team has already begun rolling out restoration of full access for all the accounts and expect to finish by the end of next week. We particularly regret to report the loss in the affected accounts of approximately 10% of the messages received between July 16 and July 18.

Not the best of news, but better than Apple’s communicated so far. Another interesting tidbit is this: 

We’ve since added server capacity and tuned our software to scale better — i.e. behave more gracefully when traffic spikes. The team has also fixed over 70 bugs…

They’ve already added server capacity? They only launched two weeks ago, yet they had servers sitting around available for adding? Either they got those servers in place very fast — and clearly miscalculated what was needed at launch — or they launched without all the servers online. 

I’ve subscribed to the feed and am anxious to see what updates we get in the coming days.

Compared to the 1% above my problems are minor (but quite annoying), and in total they harm the MobileMe experience. Further, it’s hard to be comfortable with this system knowing that some people are getting rocked by it. Until the system truly settles down, there’s no particular reason to think any subscribed account couldn’t be next.

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8 thoughts on “Apple Posts MobileMe Status Page With RSS Feed.

  1. Luis,

    The iPhone is not necessarily relevant to a discussion of MobileMe. What Apple KNEW rolling into that weekend is that they had roughly 1.7M .Mac subscribers to support, and they failed even at that. For them to act as if they didn’t know this is odd.

    Clearly, they didn’t realize what a poor performer it was, and then there’s those 70+ bugs they’ve already fixed. And keep in mind that even after this we have the horrendous email issues for some, and general issues for many (myself included).

    If Apple reports that a huge percentage of iPhone users (or others) signed up for MMe trials, they may have a case, but unless the number of subscribers jumped by a LARGE volume, the whole argument of too much load on the servers is likely only true if their code turned out to be a dog.

  2. quote;
    “On the other hand it seems that Apple are throwing a lot of resources at this and they completely underestimated how much demand there would be for MM… I’ll be following the RSS feed too, just to see what happen.”

    The first iPhone sold 1 million in 74 days. 270K in the first 2 days.
    The iPhone 3G sold 1 million in 3 days… like 4 times the first burst and 30 times the “million mark”.

    I could understand that Apple misscalculated almost everything,

  3. Apparently the MobileMe service was wildly more blockbuster than even Apple anticipated. Hopefully it settles down soon and becomes a paragon of stability. That said, other than opening day, I’ve had super performance.

  4. Well, when I finally get around to buying that new iPhone, they should have the service ready.

    Priorities, priorities.

  5. Yes, it’s likely that they did slap more hardware in place very fast. It isn’t difficult, really. Apple has the capability to scale very quickly both within its own data centers and via Akamai.

    Apple probably underestimated growth & performance in certain areas and scaled them to match.

  6. I don’t use MM…. but I have been thinking about it – at the end of June I subscribed to a page that would email me when MM was launched and ready – that turned up two days ago… subscribe now?? me thinks not…

    On the other hand it seems that Apple are throwing a lot of resources at this and they completely underestimated how much demand there would be for MM… I’ll be following the RSS feed too, just to see what happen.

  7. “They’ve already added server capacity? They only launched two weeks ago, yet they had servers sitting around available for adding? Either they got those servers in place very fast — and clearly miscalculated what was needed at launch — or they launched without all the servers online.”

    They stated that they wanted the servers to “behave more gracefully when traffic spikes”. So –maybe– they just misscalculated “spikes” (like the 13.000 iPhones requests per second at O2!)

    On the other hand, Apple has a really big farm of servers to serve its own needs, Apple site, Apple Store, [old] .Mac, developers… So –maybe– they just “reassign servers” from its own cloud.

    In a very personal opinion, your post are good, but –maybe– they will seem better to me if you account for more than “a [disastrous] cause”.

  8. The second quote makes it sound like Software QA screwed the pooch. I wonder if Steve will let any of them live. 🙂

    My biggest complaint with MobileMe is that it violates just about every part of HIG (Human Interface Guidelines) that I remember. In fact, it has an eerie resemblance to the sewage that flows from Redmond.

    Changing subjects, thank you for all the great articles. I truly appreciate that I can always find well reasoned and insightful content at your site.

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