Google: A “draconian” future is OK, as long as it’s ours

“It’s really fun to work with other folks in the ecosystem to meet the needs of users, much nicer than just saying no.”

Actually, Mr. Gundotra, Google is meeting the needs of its business and the corporations it’s chosen to work with. Users come after that.

There’s nothing wrong with this. It’s Google’s business plan and they’re free to pursue it. Unlike so many, I have no issue with “walled gardens”, since it’s my choice to enter one or not. Let the best company (products, services, and support) win.

My gripe is masking it with BS buzzwords like “freedom” and “open” when we’re talking about products like Flash, or a hardware Google TV component not likely to accept Yahoo! or Bing searches. There are a lot of questions for Google to answer, but a fawning tech press seems unwilling to ask them.

Curated hypocrisy: How Google camouflages its attacks on Apple « counternotions

Just as Adobe is desperately trying to yell at the world, “Don’t buy into Apple’s walled garden, get locked into our own proprietary Flash,” so is Google trying to misdirect consumers’ attention from its own monopolistic sins to Apple’s mobile platform where 100 million users voted with their own money to enjoy 200,000 apps. The evil man behind the curtain in this scenario is not Apple’s curation, it’s the frightening prospect of Google getting cut off from search and ad revenue derived from its naked domination of the search box on top of your web browser.

Excellent article.

Adobe: fighting logic with advertising

“Create-once/deploy-everwhere” apps may have some appeal for developers, but homogenization is not a user advantage. Apple is doing what they’ve done forever — trying to create the best user experience. In doing so, they’re actually the only company who does provide choice.

Good point. As he explains, Apple provides choice away from all the homogenized platforms.

Ghost of Adobe past visits Apple: Co-founders exhumed to join the wailing

Tough love–or irony–seems to be the theme, with the ad opening with a big “We [heart] Apple” and continuing with a reprimand about Apple’s position on Flash, which Adobe claims in a bit of bloviatory grandstanding is a threat to freedom and the evolution of the Web.

Whining, blog entries, ads, and dragging in old friends (enemies?). If Adobe spent half as much time making better business decisions they might not even be in this mess.

Even more pathetic than the war of words is that Adobe finally being able to capture mobile Flash in a demo where it’s not crashing is considered a plus. It’s already at least two years too late, yet demoing it on mondo hardware without it freezing is a big deal? How the mighty (expectations) have fallen.

Ghost of Adobe past visits Apple: Co-founders exhumed to join the wailing

Tough love–or irony–seems to be the theme, with the ad opening with a big “We [heart] Apple” and continuing with a reprimand about Apple’s position on Flash, which Adobe claims in a bit of bloviatory grandstanding is a threat to freedom and the evolution of the Web.

Whining, blog entries, ads, and dragging in old friends (enemies?). If Adobe spent half as much time making better business decisions they might not even be in this mess.

Even more pathetic than the war of words is that Adobe finally being able to capture mobile Flash in a demo where it’s not crashing is considered a plus. It’s already at least two years too late, yet demoing it on mondo hardware without it freezing is a big deal? How the mighty (expectations) have fallen.

Adobe Brought An Advertisement To A Gun Fight

So where does that leave you? Well, to be frank, shit out of luck.

On one hand, there’s an urge to feel bad for you. You really are getting screwed here. On the other hand, you really did it to yourselves.

Good article.

The more Adobe whines, the less inclined any rational person should be to feel sorry for them. In fact, making this an issue of either pity or schadenfreude is pointless. Adobe’s a corporation, nothing more. As I’ve said before, Adobe made decisions that are coming back to haunt them. That’s life. And business.

It’s time for Adobe to put up or shut up. They need to deliver a great Flash mobile experience (not happening soon enough), or great iPhone OS apps (not happening, if Ideas and Photoshop for iPhone are any indication), or maybe even great HTML5 tools (so far it’s been lip service only). Instead, all they’ve delivered are complaints and promises, mixed in with advertisements and unimpressive demos that don’t help their case.