Oh Goody, Another iPhone vs. Android Feature List

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All the article “proves” is that it’s just as easy to devise a feature list favoring the iPhone as it is to favor Android. Big deal.

The inherent worth of a product is the total package, from the hardware to the software to the ecosystem. When measured on that scale I think the iPhone beats up Android and takes its lunch money. But you’ll never capture that in a feature list, can’t we just leave those to the marketing people?

Michael Arrington: Don’t Buy The HTC EVO, It Is A Seriously Flawed Device

If you want an Android phone right now, get a Nexus One. In January I believed it was by far the best phone on the market. The new iPhone 4, though, is clearly superior. I’d rather see you buy that device and deal with the Apple dictatorship than get a phone you aren’t going to be happy with.

Pretty strong words from Arrington. Especially when you consider that he abhors Apple, and has all but turned TechCrunch into a Google PR machine.

No surprise if Android phones are outselling the iPhone

Something like this was inevitable, given that:

  1. Two models of the iPhone (the 3GS and 3G) are doing battle with scads of Android handsets in an array of shapes and sizes;
  2. You can buy an Android phone for a lot less than an iPhone (the original Droid launched in November at the same contract price as an iPhone 3GS–now Amazon has ‘em for twenty bucks;
  3. Three out of four major U.S. wireless carriers still don’t have the iPhone.

The article nails it. There are too many makes/models of Android phones for this not to happen.

It’s not that big a deal from an iPhone perspective. The fragmentation of different models, different Android OS versions, different custom software, on carriers with different update policies, lessens the impact of their sheer number.

No surprise if Android phones are outselling the iPhone

Something like this was inevitable, given that:

  1. Two models of the iPhone (the 3GS and 3G) are doing battle with scads of Android handsets in an array of shapes and sizes;
  2. You can buy an Android phone for a lot less than an iPhone (the original Droid launched in November at the same contract price as an iPhone 3GS–now Amazon has ‘em for twenty bucks;
  3. Three out of four major U.S. wireless carriers still don’t have the iPhone.

The article nails it. There are too many makes/models of Android phones for this not to happen.

It’s not that big a deal from an iPhone perspective. The fragmentation of different models, different Android OS versions, different custom software, on carriers with different update policies, lessens the impact of their sheer number.

Microsoft and HTC: If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em

It gets weirder.  Microsoft, in turn, would recieve royalties on every Google Android phone sold by HTC.  So, for a few bucks per Android device, Microsoft gives HTC the ammunition it needs to fight off Apple in its patent disputes.

Despite public statements to the contrary, HTC must be concerned about the Apple lawsuit. Otherwise there’s little reason to give Microsoft “a few bucks” per phone for, essentially, nothing. Windows Mobile is in terrible shape, so if Microsoft had any phone patents (i.e., “ammunition”) worth having they’d have gone after the smartphone vendors themselves by now. They haven’t.

Instead, I think Microsoft licensed HTC a bill of goods that looks good in a press release. Microsoft gets cash money for HTC phones sold, but doesn’t have to dirty their hands with any legal battle that’ll cost millions (and they’re not confident in winning).

Sure, HTC can go back to Apple and say “See? We have these Microsoft patents, are you scared now?”, but I think Apple will be unimpressed. Again, it looks good in a press release, and in tech pundits’ columns, but all it’ll likely do is stretch the case, and the cloud over HTC, out further, which is not a good thing for HTC.

I would think HTC tried first to cross-license with Apple (after all, they’re the ones holding the patents HTC’s alleged to be infringing), but Apple said no. Microsoft made overtures, HTC grabbed, and Microsoft laughs all the way to the bank.

The New HTC EVO 4G: An Android Phone Designed For Geeks

What makes this thing better than any other device out there including the iPhone? (again, we’re talking hardware here)

Which does not make it better than the iPhone. Sheesh. How long before this sinks in?

Despite all Apple’s taught us about the sum of the parts being greater then the whole, and the complete experience determining a user’s satisfaction with a device, we still have geeky pundits drooling over tech marketing checklists. As if the spec sheet makes the device. It does not.

If this was the hardware in the next iPhone, how many of you out there would be upset?

Perhaps none, but that’s because it would still be the iPhone, offering the iPhone’s smooth integration and attention to detail. Shouldn’t that be an easy thing to understand by now?

I think Android phones should focus on getting the user experience right before chasing their marketing group’s buzz words. Then again, if you’re a phone designed for geeks you don’t have to bother, I guess.