Adobe Brought An Advertisement To A Gun Fight

So where does that leave you? Well, to be frank, shit out of luck.

On one hand, there’s an urge to feel bad for you. You really are getting screwed here. On the other hand, you really did it to yourselves.

Good article.

The more Adobe whines, the less inclined any rational person should be to feel sorry for them. In fact, making this an issue of either pity or schadenfreude is pointless. Adobe’s a corporation, nothing more. As I’ve said before, Adobe made decisions that are coming back to haunt them. That’s life. And business.

It’s time for Adobe to put up or shut up. They need to deliver a great Flash mobile experience (not happening soon enough), or great iPhone OS apps (not happening, if Ideas and Photoshop for iPhone are any indication), or maybe even great HTML5 tools (so far it’s been lip service only). Instead, all they’ve delivered are complaints and promises, mixed in with advertisements and unimpressive demos that don’t help their case.

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No surprise if Android phones are outselling the iPhone

Something like this was inevitable, given that:

  1. Two models of the iPhone (the 3GS and 3G) are doing battle with scads of Android handsets in an array of shapes and sizes;
  2. You can buy an Android phone for a lot less than an iPhone (the original Droid launched in November at the same contract price as an iPhone 3GS–now Amazon has ‘em for twenty bucks;
  3. Three out of four major U.S. wireless carriers still don’t have the iPhone.

The article nails it. There are too many makes/models of Android phones for this not to happen.

It’s not that big a deal from an iPhone perspective. The fragmentation of different models, different Android OS versions, different custom software, on carriers with different update policies, lessens the impact of their sheer number.

No surprise if Android phones are outselling the iPhone

Something like this was inevitable, given that:

  1. Two models of the iPhone (the 3GS and 3G) are doing battle with scads of Android handsets in an array of shapes and sizes;
  2. You can buy an Android phone for a lot less than an iPhone (the original Droid launched in November at the same contract price as an iPhone 3GS–now Amazon has ‘em for twenty bucks;
  3. Three out of four major U.S. wireless carriers still don’t have the iPhone.

The article nails it. There are too many makes/models of Android phones for this not to happen.

It’s not that big a deal from an iPhone perspective. The fragmentation of different models, different Android OS versions, different custom software, on carriers with different update policies, lessens the impact of their sheer number.

The iPad vs. Android’s fragmentation

That 20,000 sales figure is decent on its own, but it becomes much more impressive when putting it in context. Rohit tells us he’s had sales of about $100,000 from iPhone apps so far this year, and just $5,000 from Android apps…

When we were talking with Rohit, we asked about the relatively weak Android sales. Rohit blames it on Google’s lame Android Market, “Google does not provide web links that we can link to app — they have no store. Google being a web company, this is unacceptable.”

Rohit also says fragmentation is a problem on Android, saying “It’s really absurd, we have to buy all latest Android phones, test on all of them, each phone manufacturer makes some customizations as well.” But a new SDK is coming that should help with that.

The article is about the success of the developer with an iPad app, which is nice.

More interesting, however, is the state of Android app sales and the Market Place. It’s a real issue, but one Google has little real incentive to spend time and resources to address. Indeed, since it’s tied so closely to various carriers’ and hardware manufacturers’ business decisions regarding custom software, and differing update policies, it’s not even exclusively Google’s issue to address.

The iPad vs. Android’s fragmentation

That 20,000 sales figure is decent on its own, but it becomes much more impressive when putting it in context. Rohit tells us he’s had sales of about $100,000 from iPhone apps so far this year, and just $5,000 from Android apps…

When we were talking with Rohit, we asked about the relatively weak Android sales. Rohit blames it on Google’s lame Android Market, “Google does not provide web links that we can link to app — they have no store. Google being a web company, this is unacceptable.”

Rohit also says fragmentation is a problem on Android, saying “It’s really absurd, we have to buy all latest Android phones, test on all of them, each phone manufacturer makes some customizations as well.” But a new SDK is coming that should help with that.

The article is about the success of the developer with an iPad app, which is nice.

More interesting, however, is the state of Android app sales and the Market Place. It’s a real issue, but one Google has little real incentive to spend time and resources to address. Indeed, since it’s tied so closely to various carriers’ and hardware manufacturers’ business decisions regarding custom software, and differing update policies, it’s not even exclusively Google’s issue to address.

Adobe and their house of straw

Adobe says Apple is stifling competition by barring
developers from using Adobe’s products to create applications
for iPhones and iPads

What a bunch of whiners Adobe has become. A once-proud company resorting to begging the government to force Apple to owe it a living. It’s especially galling because Adobe won’t suck it up and admit to their own mistakes.

Instead, Adobe has chosen to expect help from others for their own bad business decisions.

Waa! We were wrong about Apple, and so busy building our house from that cash cow Creative Suite to see things changing. We never saw the mobile movement coming. Never bothered (and still haven’t bothered) to get Flash running on a mobile device. Now we’re completely unprepared. Our desktop behemoth won’t help us there, and if we don’t ride Apple’s coattails into the mobile space we’ll be blown down.

Adobe’s the little pig banging on the door of Apple’s house of bricks.

Adobe Flash doesn’t run on the iPhone, iPad, or anywhere mobile.

That said, many major websites still do not support HTML 5 fully, so iPhone and iPad users will contine to have a broken experience when it comes to the Web.

And so will every other mobile platform user.

With the possible exception of a Nokia device only 50 people have heard of, there’s nothing that has a Flash experience like the desktop (i.e., the kind Adobe likes to brag about). And Adobe has already stated smartphones pre-installed with this alleged support have been pushed back to the last half of the year.

Meanwhile, the JooJoo (with better hardware than the average smartphone), runs the infamous Flash 10.1 — allegedly the saving grace of Flash on mobile devices — and the results are horrendous. Adobe distanced themselves from the JooJoo as fast as they could, but shortly thereafter pushed back the date as mentioned above.

I have no issue with everybody pointing out that Flash doesn’t run on the iPad/iPhone. I do have an issue with those people not mentioning in the same breath that neither does anybody else to speak of.

Adobe can’t get Flash to work on mobiles, and have delivered nothing but promises. How about taking them to task for that instead of pointing out that today’s devices don’t run what doesn’t exist?