It’s only May, but I already know one nominee for stupidest tech product of the year.

Running Windows XP, the Eee Keyboard packs an entire computer — complete with an Intel Atom N270 processor at 1.6 GHz, 1GB RAM, 16GB SSD, Wi-Fi b/g/n, HDMI out, built-in 5″ WVGA multitouch display and a battery rated for 4 hours — into the pretty tiny frame of a keyboard. Want in? That’ll be $599.

At $99 it’d be ridiculous. At $600, words fail me.

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It’s only May, but I already know one nominee for stupidest tech product of the year.

Running Windows XP, the Eee Keyboard packs an entire computer — complete with an Intel Atom N270 processor at 1.6 GHz, 1GB RAM, 16GB SSD, Wi-Fi b/g/n, HDMI out, built-in 5″ WVGA multitouch display and a battery rated for 4 hours — into the pretty tiny frame of a keyboard. Want in? That’ll be $599.

At $99 it’d be ridiculous. At $600, words fail me.

ClamCase: Turn your iPad into a mini-laptop, or touch netbook, or sleek writing machine, or whatever-you-want-to-call-it

Pretty cool idea, and the marketing stuff looks great.

This is not for me, as I have a bluetooth keyboard at home and have not even bothered to pair it with my iPad yet. Still, if you’re working on the next Moby Dick, you might want a physical keyboard, and this could make a more attractive package for you. Judging from the way their site is getting slammed right now, I guess there’s lots of interest. 

Of Typing and Software Keyboards

A lot of commentary on the iPad keyboard revolves around touch typists. I’ve been banging away on keyboards for over three decades, but I confess I’m not a touch typist.

As a sophomore in high school I took a typing class. If memory serves, I finished with about 45wpm and 2 errors. I never practiced or took another class. By the time I started using keyboards for a living I’d forgotten it all… Continue reading

TAB – The Truth About Software Keyboards

Harry McCracken at Technologizer wrote a nice piece about the virtues of hardware keyboards on smartphones.

I think one reason a keyboard argument even exists is because when competing in a given market you have to tag a competitor’s hot product with a “missing feature,” and then provide that feature. (How many manufacturers claimed FM radio and replaceable batteries were glaring omissions from the iPod, only to find adding it to their devices made no difference?)…

Read the rest of this article on theAppleBlog >>